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Ten More Things to do in Dublin

In compiling our recent list of ten things to do in Dublin, we had a tough time narrowing all the must-see sights, things to do and tourist attractions in Dublin down to just ten; so, as promised, here’s ten more.

 

Old Jameson Distillery


Irish Whiskey is booming right now, and no more so than in the capital. With plenty of new whiskey brands emerging, so to have several distilleries in Dublin, many of which have opened their doors to the public, offering interactive tours, tastings, and insight to their whisky making process. However, before all of these popped up, there was the famous Jameson Whiskey distillery. Recently renovated to an immaculate finish, it is well worth a visit – not just for whiskey connoisseurs, but anyone interested in the fascinating story of our most iconic whiskey brand.

Nestled in the heart of a rejuvenated Smithfield square, sits the Old Jameson Whiskey distillery on Bow-street. Passionate tour guides bring you on a journey through the history of Ireland's famous whiskey brand with an interactive tasting experience at the end where you will compare and learn about Scotch, American and, of course, Jameson Irish whiskey. You will learn all about John Jameson and his legacy as well as gaining a captivating insight into the craft and heritage of Irish Whiskey.

Tours run every 25minutes, last approx. 40 minutes, cost €20 per adult (10% off if booked online) or €16 for students and includes whiskey tastings, a complimentary Jameson. There's even an opportunity to bottle your own cask-strength Jameson whiskey on site. Open daily from 9 a.m. (10 a.m. on Sundays) to 6 pm with the last tour of the day commencing at 5:15 pm.

Old Jameson Distillery

 

Irish Whiskey Museum


Sticking with Irish whiskey for a moment, and in line with the huge surge in popularity recently, The Irish Whiskey museum is an independent museum and the only museum in the world dedicated to Irish whiskey, reflective of the revival Irish whiskey is currently enjoying.

For €20 for adults or €18 for students, visitors are taken on a guided tour through the fascinating history of Irish whiskey and learn about the craft of distilling as well as tasting three Irish Whiskeys with your guide. For an additional €3, you can upgrade to a Premium tour which also includes aged whiskey as part of the tasting experience and a unique Irish whisky glass – a very nice little souvenir. Open daily from 11 am to 8 pm, tours run approximately every 20-30 mins. and last about an hour or so.

Irish Whiskey Museum

 

St. Stephen's Green Park


This enclosed park was opened to the public in 1877 thanks to Arthur E. Guinness, a member of the famous Guinness brewer family, having been only accessible to residents of the houses surrounding the perimeter of the park since 1664. It is still enjoyed today by people in Dublin city as one of many idyllic green spaces sprinkled about the concrete of Dublin's urban centre.

St. Stephen's Green Park is 9 hectares of the city which contains many notable features including decorative fountains, ponds & lakes accommodating ducks and swans, waterfalls, several statues in commemoration of historic events, like the great famine, and famous local artists and writers such as James Joyce and Irish leaders of rebellions & risings.

The park was occupied by up to 250 insurgents during the Easter Rising of 1916 and gunfire was temporarily halted on occasion to allow for feeding of the local ducks in the park. The park is steeped in remarkable history as well as being a modern city park, perfect for strolling and relaxing in.

St. Stephen's Green Park

 

The GPO


It might seem somewhat strange to consider a post office a site of interest, but the General Post Office on Dublin's main thoroughfare, O'Connell Street, is a building which was central to some key and pivotal events in recent Irish history.

This great Georgian public building famously served as the headquarters of the leaders of 1916 Easter rising, a most important turning point in the history of the nation. The original facade still bears the scars of the uprising with bullet holes visible in the masonry of the columns. The building has been a lasting iconic symbol of nationalism since that period of history and to that end houses several historically valuable and interesting artefacts including an original copy of the proclamation of the Irish Republic and an extended exhibition. Of course, any free walking tour in Dublin worth its salt will give you insight to the 1916 rising, so the GPO is a great attraction in Dublin to visit after your tour.

General Post Office on Dublin's main thoroughfare

 

Glasnevin Cemetery


A short distance north of O'Connell street sits Ireland's largest cemetery, Glasnevin cemetery. This Victorian Garden Cemetery, dating back to 1828, contains the graves of over one million people spanning generations – many of whom were of renown as artists, politicians, warriors and national heroes.

There is an award-winning museum on site as well as exhibitions & guided tours charting the history of the nation through imaginative dramatic re-enactments, interactive exhibits and lectures and there is also a genealogy area where one can easily research their ancestry. A cemetery might not initially seem to be a typical visitor attraction, but Glasnevin Cemetery is a special place offering a unique perspective and insight to the socio, political and cultural history of Dublin & Ireland and is well worth visiting. And if all that gives you a thirst pop into John Kavanagh's, The Gravediggers pub, beside the cemetery – a great little pub and it's where the expression 'a jar' referring to a glass of beer came from!

Glasnevin Cemetery

 

The Brazen Head


And while we’re mentioning good pubs, The Brazen Head claims to be the oldest Pub in Ireland, having been established in 1198. That 'fact' is contested by some other long-established pubs in the country but never-the-less there's no denying the old-timey feel of this great pub. Located close to the river Liffey on lower Bridge street, the Brazen Head offers a lively, intimately-sized yet spacious beer garden with seating, decent Irish food, great craic, live traditional music and a fun, friendly atmosphere surrounded by the aged, dark-wood decor.

It is quite popular among tourists for all of these reasons, but it does have a good contingent of local regulars as well as some local Dublin bar staff, so you won't feel like you've wandered into a total tourist trap. It's a good pit-stop en-route to or from the Guinness Storehouse for some traditional food such as Irish stew or Fish & chips.

The Brazen Head

 

The Ha' Penny Bridge


The first pedestrian bridge across the river Liffey linking the north and south sides of Dublin was built in 1816 to replace the deteriorating fleet of ferries which had previously brought people across the river. Until 1919 there was a toll of half a penny to cross the bridge, hence its name.

The distinctive 43 meter-spanning beautiful elliptical iron arch has become an iconic image for Dublin and is a unique piece of old Dublin town still in use today. You can hear a lot more about the Ha' Penny bridge from your local guide on the FREETOUR.com recommended Free Tour of Dublin which actually begins at the south foot of the ha’ penny bridge.

The Ha' Penny Bridge

 

Oscar Wilde Statue


The only statue in colour in Dublin is of one of the nation's most colourful characters, Oscar Wilde. Sitting in the characteristically beautiful & historic Georgian area of Dublin on the corner of Merrion Square Park, the green, pink and shiny black tones reflect the flamboyance in the life and art of Wilde, the world-famous author, playwright and poet who gave the world such timeless works as The Importance of Being Earnest, An Ideal Husband and The Picture of Dorian Gray.

Famous quotes of Wilde, depicting his remarkable wit, are etched on pillars in front of the sculpture which is located opposite the house the man himself was born in at 1 Merrion Square.

Oscar Wilde Statue

 

Dublinia


In the heart of old Viking & Medieval Dublin is Dublinia, a heritage centre where you can really experience what life was like in Dublin in Viking & Medieval times. Viking legacy has had a profound impact on Dublin and Ireland, and here you will learn all about it; from voyages, warriors and weapons to their ways of life, poetry and myths in a fun and interactive way.

You will also explore the Dublin town of 700 years ago, learn about Medieval life, tales of death and disease, torturous punishments for crimes, Medieval games and even smell the odours of a bustling Medieval Dublin and see genuine Viking & Medieval artefacts. Entry costs €10 for adults or €9 for students, €6.50 per child or €26 for family tickets which covers two adults and two children. Last entry is 5:30pm (4:30pm Oct. - Feb. Inclusive) daily.

Dublinia

 

St. Patrick's Cathedral


St Patrick's Cathedral stands majestically on a site which is believed to have been visited by Saint Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, over 1500 years ago, where he is thought to have baptised people at a well. It is a very historically and architecturally valuable place, with a history going back as far as 450 AD and would have made quite the statement in 1260 when the impressive building as it stands today was completed. Guided tours are available from Monday to Saturday until 3:30 pm. Entry costs €7 for adults and €6 for students.

St. Patrick's Cathedral

 

There you have it, dear traveller, our second batch of ten things to do in Dublin. You can get to grips with all things Dublin and Ireland by booking your spot on the best free tours in Dublin and get more handy tips & tricks and insider recommendations from your friendly local tour guide. Do let us know which of our twenty recommendations have made it onto your must-do list for Dublin and, of course, if you have any of your own recommendations you think should make our next lot of things to do, in the comments. We hope that you’ll have a wonderful time in the Irish capital in 2019, happy touring.